Ford Cortina

Blog-image-Cortina-750

My sister’s boyfriend had one of these, only his was a mustard colour. I used to enjoy sliding into the back seat, cruising the back streets of Johnsonville – Abba belting out SOS from the cassette player on the parcel shelf. Slightly on the too loud side, speakers rattling. Sis was partial to a bit of Abba back then but who cared, this was a Mark 1 Cortina and we were cruisin’. The Boyfriend was probably wondering why the little brother was always in tow, but that never really occurred to me. Sis and the Boyfriend up front, me in the back with Abba having my own party, maybe it wasn’t such a big deal. To be honest, Johnsonville wasn’t that glam – twice around the block was enough before the lure of the bright lights drew us to ‘The Mall’ – this is where it really happened in Johnsonville on Friday night, I can tell you.

Purchase your classic here

Building the biggest classic car collection on Etsy

Series 2 Land Rover

Blog-image-Land-Rover-750

I was down at the Cardrona for a photo shoot a few years ago. When it opened in 1863 it was a gold miners pub and after the gold was gone, the pub continued serving the local farming community. The long serving publican, Jimmy Patterson, would regulate how much his patrons could drink – one drink for those heading up the road over the treacherous Crown Range, and two for others heading down the road to Wanaka. None for the women. Jimmy died in 1961, aged 91, and the hotel was closed. It sat empty for years, slowly deteriorating until a local bought it in the 90’s and did it up. After the shoot, we drove up the road a bit to visit my wife’s uncles in Clyde  – Bill and Alan. They are Southern men of few words, can put you in your place with a raised eyebrow, or will end a half finished story with a chuckle leaving you to finish the story yourself. Masters of the understatement. In fact, an entire story could be a chuckle, they’ll all understand and have a wee chuckle themselves. We told them about our week at the Cardrona shooting and it was followed by a bit of a pause. Eventually Bill piped up and said ‘Oh yip’. Another pause (pauses are normal though, nothing’s urgent in this part of the country), and then he added ‘The Cardrona aye? Hear it’s changed a bit since I was up there last in … awe … 1943’. 

Purchase your classic here

Building the biggest classic car collection on Etsy

1958 Cadillac DeVille

Blog-image-De-Ville-Cadillac

This car is best known for its part in a photograph of Marilyn Monroe, looking a little surprised with her white dress blowing in the wind. Marilyn was on her way to the opera in New York City where she was meeting John (John was waiting in the opera house foyer, in disguise, as his wife Jackie thought he was working late). As Marilyn approached the foyer entrance, she passed a Cadillac DeVille parked at the curb-side. Inside the car was a little girl, the daughter of an advertising executive from Madison Avenue who had just bought a new camera and flash. The girl was playing with the camera while her Dad popped into the drug store to buy cigarettes. Suddenly the flash went off, catching Marilyn by surprise – she nearly jumped out of her skin. The famous pose had been captured. A few weeks later, when the film was processed, the ad exec realised what he had. He immediately put the photo and negative into an envelope and posted them straight to Marilyn, apologising for the breach of privacy. Marilyn wrote back and said ‘no worries’ and posted the photo on her Facebook page. It went viral. Marilyn became the first internet sensation. There have been lots of sensations since but Marilyn is still the most famous.  

Purchase your classic here

Building the biggest classic car collection on Etsy

Triumph Vitesse 1600

Blog-image-Camden-Guitars-750

Back in the 1920s there was a guy called Adolph Rickenbacker who realised nobody was making electric guitars. In fact, he realised nobody had even invented one. Along came another guy, George Beauchamp, who had a patent for an electric guitar but didn’t know what an electric guitar was yet. So between them, they invented one. It had a very long neck and small round body and they said ‘Hey, it’s a fry pan’. Fry pan was already taken so George said ‘What shall we call it then, Rickenbacker?’ and Adolph said ‘OK, let’s call it Rickenbacker’. So that was settled and they started making guitars. As is often the way with guitar sales, the ebbs and flows are affected by who is playing what and when. One afternoon, while test driving a new bright red Vitesse, a young fella called John spotted one in a shop window. John immediately rang Ed Sullivan and said ‘Hey Ed, I can get you a Rickenbacker on your show, what do you reckon?’. So John, with some of his mates, went to America for the now legendary ‘1964 Rickenbacker appearance’ on the Ed Sullivan show. Not long after, John’s mates George and Paul joined the Rickenbacker club. Then John noticed everyone had Rickenbacker’s except poor ol’ Ringo, who only had drums – so John gave Ringo one he didn’t want and that’s how the four lads from Liverpool became The Rickles. What?

Purchase your classic here

Building the biggest classic car collection on Etsy

Morris Minor Traveller

Blog-image-Traveller-750

When my wife was a design student some years ago, her car of choice was a Morry. Common to students at the time, insurance was beyond her budget once the weekly pub expenses were covered (she has always had an admirable sense of priority). She also has a strong sense of social responsibility and having no insurance was something of a burden. With this in mind, she developed a strategy to keep her, and her fellow motorists, safe on the road. Every panel on her Morry was painted a different colour. Rough as guts its was. My wife (who was always ‘very creative’, according to her mum) regarded it as a work of art, others regarded it an old banger. Whether a work of art or old banger, it made other drivers nervous. Change lanes on the motorway, no problem, everyone stayed clear. Park at the supermarket, no problem, everyone stayed clear. Shoot an orange light, no problem, everyone stayed clear. Worked a treat it did, never so much as a scratch.

Purchase your classic here

Building the biggest classic car collection on Etsy